trust in the storm

Trouble finds us on this broken planet.

Storms threaten the lives we build, the people we love.

When storms arise, what can we do?

In Psalm 28, David shows us the way of trust.

Trust requires relationship“To you, O LORD, I call; my rock…”

The biblical idea of trust is one of attaching oneself, relying on someone or something else. feeling safe, being confident. To survive the storm, we must trust, or attach ourselves to something.  Too often, we tie ourselves to others, looking to them for rescue, forgetting they too are subject to wind and wave.  Instead, we must look for the Rock, the only immovable One, and attach ourselves to Him.

Trust invites communication. “Hear the voice of my pleas for mercy, when I cry to you for help…Blessed be the LORD! For he has heard the voice of my pleas for mercy.”

Securely attached to the Rock, our only help, we can confidently pray in the midst of the storm.  Like the boom of thunder or a sudden deluge, storm prayers are sporadic pleas and cries, punctuated by moments of both desperation and praise.  When we trust, we are unashamed of our cries and unhindered in our worship.

Trust helps.  “in him my heart trusts and I am helped…”

Knowing we’ve been heard, we find strength, not in ourselves, not in our fellow travelers, but in the LORD, Jehovah.  We recognize that He alone is our shield, our covering, our saving refuge in every storm.

Even kings face storms.  In the midst of incredible difficulty, David learned how to trust.

Centuries later, his words invite us to do the same.

Psalm 28:1-2, 6-8 ESV

To you, O LORD, I call; my rock, be not deaf to me…Hear the voice of my pleas for mercy, when I cry to you for help, when I lift up my hands toward your most holy sanctuary.  Blessed by the LORD! For he has heard the voice of my pleas for mercy.

The LORD is my strength and my shield;  In him my heart trusts and I am helped; my heart exults, and with my song I give thanks to him.

The LORD is the strength of his people; he is the saving refuge of his anointed.

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